Have you checked out Biblia Luna?

I have begun to write a newsletter on the topic of "the intersection of faith and mental illness." In this weekly online newsletter, I write a few things: A look at the Bible readings assigned for next Sunday in the Revised Common Lectionary (used by many mainline Protestant churches), from the standpoint of mental illness.Some … Continue reading Have you checked out Biblia Luna?

Emmaus Labyrinth #62: New Hope United Church of Christ, Glen Rock, PA

This is one of a series of posts about a trip I took to walk labyrinths in July 2022. See this post to see why I refer to these labyrinths as my "Emmaus labyrinths." Note: the numbering refers not to how many labyrinths I walked on this trip, but to the total number I've blogged … Continue reading Emmaus Labyrinth #62: New Hope United Church of Christ, Glen Rock, PA

Emmaus Labyrinth #59: St. John’s United Church of Christ, Chambersburg, PA

This is one of a series of posts about a trip I took to walk labyrinths in July 2022. See this post to see why I refer to these labyrinths as my "Emmaus labyrinths." Note: the numbering refers not to how many labyrinths I walked on this trip, but to the total number I've blogged … Continue reading Emmaus Labyrinth #59: St. John’s United Church of Christ, Chambersburg, PA

Emmaus Labyrinth #55: Mt. Calvary Episcopal Church, Camp Hill, PA

This is one of a series of posts about a trip I took to walk labyrinths in July 2022. See this post to see why I refer to these labyrinths as my "Emmaus labyrinths." Note: the numbering refers not to how many labyrinths I walked on this trip, but to the total number I've blogged … Continue reading Emmaus Labyrinth #55: Mt. Calvary Episcopal Church, Camp Hill, PA

I don’t believe people can change

People never change. Their opinions and their thoughts are what they are, and nothing can change that. When I prepare sermons, and reflect upon sermons I’ve preached, I sometimes think, People never change. What’s the point of preaching? When I read about polarizing political topics, I often think, People never change. What’s the point in … Continue reading I don’t believe people can change

The Mercy I’ve Been Shown (Sermon)

This is an adapted version of the sermon I preached this morning, the twelfth Sunday in Ordinary Time. The gospel reading was Luke 8:26-39. The sermon was clearly inspired in part by the recent release of my book, Darkwater. The stories in scripture are our stories of faith, stories that tell us about ourselves and … Continue reading The Mercy I’ve Been Shown (Sermon)

The Tender Mercies (Sermon)

This is an adapted form of the sermon I preached on the First Sunday of Advent, November 28, 2021. The texts I preached on were not the usual texts of the day. Rather, they were Luke 1:67-79 and Matthew 2:1-12. Blessed be the Lord God of Israel, for he has looked favorably on his people … Continue reading The Tender Mercies (Sermon)

My Two Wolves

There’s an old story I’ve heard many times throughout my life. I encountered it again a few days ago at the Alternatives Partial Hospitalization program. It’s a story that’s sometimes called “The Two Wolves.” It goes something like this: An old Cherokee is teaching his grandson about life. “A fight is going on inside me,” … Continue reading My Two Wolves

The Hardest Words to Say

I have noticed that I have a very difficult relationship with some words. For instance, the sentence, you’re welcome. When someone thanks me for something, I usually respond with, “No problem,” or, “Sure,” or just a nod. I can’t get myself to say the words, “You’re welcome.” I’m not entirely sure why, but I think … Continue reading The Hardest Words to Say

That’ll do, Self. That’ll do.

A long time ago, I read about the difference between maximizers and satisficers. As I understand it (which may be incomplete or just plain wrong, I’ll admit), a maximizer is someone who always needs to find the perfect answer for something, and a satisficer is someone who determines a level that is “good enough,” and … Continue reading That’ll do, Self. That’ll do.